Revealing an unseen hope


I hope you’re one of the lucky ones who is either recovering or safe from the 2020 scourge. There is no such thing as being untouched by this year’s turmoil, not really. For instance, in my protective attempt to keep my husband safe, who has an underlying condition, we have been following CDC recommended isolation protocols to the letter since March. I’m thankful we’ve been able to get our groceries delivered; have the technology to still see and connect with family; and stay employed via technology. I consider myself very lucky to be able to have the option to put myself and my husband in a bubble – protections I wish everyone had. Even with all of our safety precautions, it doesn’t mean it hasn’t taken its toll. And If I didn’t prioritize my recharging outlets, I know I’d be spiraling emotionally all the time. Some days I still need my pressure-relieving time-outs because I know it’s healthy to let emotions like shock, grief, anger, and sadness move through me. Most days though, when I’ve shifted past the heaviness, I feel stronger and more capable of doing the things that recharge my self-care, my emotions, my spirit. [If you don’t know what recharges you, it’s time to learn with a free virtual recharge retreat here.] With a vaccine promised, I yearn to feel more fully human again. What’s more, my heart breaks every day seeing the suffering and loss of human life. I’m not just talking about the infection and death statistical charts, I’m talking about the overwhelmed hospitals where staff are putting their health at risk to help others, I’m talking real human bodies stacked in mobile morgues/semi-trucks because the demand of space cannot keep up with those who’ve died. I ache also because I know even after this pandemic has passed, we still must face the truth of our divided nation, the civil unrest, the inequality, the hate and lack of respect for our fellow humans. But there is hope even if it is unseen to the human eye. The hope may be small, but it is there and can be compared to other small, even microscopic things, like diatoms that have been on this earth since before the dinosaurs that are a major source of oxygen production; or sound waves that can bend and freeze molecules in beautiful fractal patterns (you can look up cymatics for more on this); or cellular structure and DNA that have a fascinating design and makeup if looked at under a microscope. Why what is microscopic is so amazing is because when it does become seen, it becomes apparent just how connected life is to everything. As humans, we are a part of these unseen connections. This is both horrifying, like the fast spread of the COVID virus, and beautiful, like our ability to create life. We are all part of a bigger picture. When we look beyond this earth and into the deep ever-expanding universe, it's clear that we share a commonality with the unseen. We are but specs in comparison to the scale of the universe, much like our earth's diatoms are seemingly mere specs to the scale of our own world. As beings on this interconnected chain, we are special because we have the ability to consciously work together, show love and compassion, and look for ways to survive and thrive. So, while there is no such thing as being untouched by 2020’s wrath, that doesn’t mean hope doesn’t exist within us, even if it’s unseen, for a better future ahead. The question then becomes, how will we make our unseen hope visible to help make the future brighter? With hope comes healing for all. That goes for the seen and unseen.

Kelly Stone Cramer